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Nutrition

What could you gain by giving up crisps?

Wednesday 5th March

We Brits love our crisps. We get through around six billion packs a year. But what are those slices of fried gold doing to our bodies?

A typical 35g bag contains about two and a half teaspoons of oil, as well as high levels of salt. These ingredients can increase the risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes and coronary disease.

There are around 130 calories in a standard bag of crisps, which you may think isn’t much.

However, every bag contains around 7.7g saturated fat so a fifth of each packet is pure fat. This accounts for 38.5% of a woman’s GDA for saturated fat, and almost 26% of a man’s.

If you give up one bag of crisps per day for a month, you’ll cut 3,640 calories and 215.6g of fat…

Useful links:

“Britons polish off six billion packets a year the equivalent of one ton of crisps every three minutes or almost 100 packets per person” Find out more.

“One ounce of plain potato chips, or about 15 to 20 chips, contains about 10 grams of fat and 154 calories. A 2011 study in "The New England Journal of Medicine" found that daily consumption of a single ounce of potato chips led to an average weight gain of 1.69 pounds over four years.”

Consumed in excess, the ingredients in crisps are well-proven by research to increase our risk of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and coronary disease. Find out more.

In a bag of salt and vinegar crisps, there are 130 calories, which isn’t that much of your GDA (2,500 for men, 2,000 for women). However, there is 7.7g saturated fat in a bag that’s 38.5% of a woman’s GDA for saturated fat, and almost 26% of a man’s. Find out more.

Figures from Mintel reveal that we eat a tonne of crisps every three minutes in the UK. Find out more.